Tuesday, June 11, 2013

The Teenage Years

                                      Excuse me, if I didn't hear you clearly
                                      The price is not what you said it would be
                                      Even though I love this car so dearly
                                      This might not be the choice that’s right for me.
                                     
                                                                               


Over the past two or three weeks I have had to make a couple of decisions that were not easy. These decisions weren’t “earth shattering” or “monumental” by any means. No one’s health or future rested on the choices that I would make. They were simply important to me and no one else.

The decisions were about deciding how much money to spend on the upkeep of my car. I had to decide whether or not I was making a bad investment by pouring more money in a car that would soon reach its thirteenth birthday. That was it! Why hadn’t I seen that earlier? The car was rebelling like any other teenager that has ever walked this earth.

Anyone who has read Mr. Joe: Tales of a Haunted Life knows that I haven’t been showered with materialistic gifts or possessions over the past sixty-plus years. You do what you can and then you hope for the best results.

My 2001 Mazda Miata was one of my first steps to realizing financial recovery. Even though I purchased this car when it was used and six years old, it was a beginning. It marked the first time that I had been approved to finance a car that nice. I had once again been trusted to keep my word on a contract. I was no longer limited to the “Buy Here, Pay Here” lots. My credit rating was on its way up.

I have since retired and paid the Mazda off. For the first time in many years I have a clear title to a car that is worth more than a week’s wages. I have a sense of pride and accomplishment that goes with meeting my obligations.

I am spending roughly 50% of the car’s retail value on bringing it up to the highest standards. I don’t think I’m making a mistake at all. This car has brought me a lot of pleasure over the past several years. The car reminds me that hard work pays off. It showed me that I was headed in the right direction when I needed to feel that I was making progress.

Sometimes “teenagers” can be expensive. Sometimes they can push you to new levels of frustration. But, I do believe that you don’t give up on anything or anyone that has been good to you. It just doesn’t sit well with me.



The Teenage Years

                                      Excuse me I'm not sure I heard you clearly
                                      That’s not the number you had told to me
                                      Even though I love this car so dearly
                                      This might not be the choice that's right for me
                                     
                                                                               


Over the past two or three weeks I have had to make a couple of decisions that were not easy. These decisions weren’t “Earth shattering” or “monumental” by any means. No one’s health or future rested on the choices that I would make. They were simply important to me and no one else.

The decisions were about deciding how much money to spend on the upkeep of my car. I had to decide whether or not I was making a bad investment by pouring more money in a car that would soon reach its thirteenth birthday. That was it! Why hadn’t I seen that earlier? The car was rebelling like any other teenager that has ever walked this Earth.

Anyone who has read Mr. Joe: Tales of a Haunted Life knows that I haven’t been showered with materialistic gifts or possessions over the past sixty-plus years. You do what you can and then you hope for the best results.

My 2001 Mazda Miata was one of my first steps to realizing financial recovery. Even though I purchased this car when it was used and six years old, it was a beginning. It marked the first time that I had been approved to finance a car that nice. I had once again been trusted to keep my word on a contract. I was no longer limited to the “Buy Here, Pay Here” lots. My credit rating was on its way up.

I have since retired and paid the Mazda off. For the first time in many years I have a clear title to a car that is worth more than a week’s wages. I have a sense of pride and accomplishment that goes with meeting my obligations.

I am spending roughly 50% of the car’s retail value on bringing it up to the highest standards. I don’t think I’m making a mistake at all. This car has brought me a lot of pleasure over the past several years. The car reminds me that hard work pays off. It showed me that I was headed in the right direction when I needed to feel that I was making progress.

Sometimes “teenagers” can be expensive. Sometimes they can push you to new levels of frustration. But, I do believe that you don’t give up on anything or anyone that has been good to you. It just doesn’t sit well with me.